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3 Types of Scenes to Cut from Your WIP

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It never ceases to amaze me how much bad writing there is in the world.


Truly, when you think about it, you can most likely remember more poorly-written books you've read than well-written ones. Why is that? Bad prose tends to stick in our memory. Think of it as a kind of gruesome car accident--you know you shouldn't watch it, but you can't look away.


Bad writing is almost predictable in its awfulness. That is, there are several contributing factors to a poorly-written piece that can be seen almost across the board.


If you want to avoid bad writing, you need to avoid the factors that contribute to bad writing. One way you can do that is by cutting these scenes.



1. Mirror Scenes


Nothing in prose irritates me more than getting character description from a reflection. Most of the time, these scenes consist of a character peering into the nearest reflective surface--whether it be a mirror or a lake or even a spoon--and commenting on his or her appearance as though noticing it for the first time. How many times do you look in the mirror and look yourself over from head to toe, noting your "caramel-colored eyes" or "luscious red curls." Probably never. Honestly,there are better ways to reveal a character's appearance.



2. Dream Sequences


Oh, goodness. Dream sequences, for me, are right up there with mirror scenes. The only difference is that, unlike a mirror scene, a well-written dream sequence can serve the plot. For example, in Veronica Roth's Divergent, dreams form an integral part of the story. Unfortunately not all dream sequences are created equal. I've seen authors slip in dreams seemingly only for the sake of making word count. Don't do that. If you're going to use a dream, make sure it's relevant to what's going in in your story.



3. Commonplace Exchanges


I once read a novel in which a whole chapter was spent chronicling a trip to the grocery store. I wish I were kidding. If your scene or chapter doesn't reveal character or move the plot along, you're better off without it. No one wants to watch your protagonist picking out produce. We do that enough in our own lives as it is.


These are just three types of scenes that can be removed for the sake of strengthening your piece. I know there are others, but these cover most of the big-picture problems.


What types of scenes do you cut from your work? Do you agree with these three?


P.S. The Art (Not Science) of Chapter BreaksAvoiding Genre Fixation, From Daily Writing Tips: 34 Writing Tips That Will Make You a Better Writer, and Said Isn't Dead.