How to Plot If You Hate Plotting

The other day, I started plotting my novel Smoke and Blood, the prequel to my debut novel Blood and Water. If you've known me longer than a few months, you know I've never been a big fan of plotting. Heck, while writing Blood and Water I even wrote a post detailing why I don't outline anymore. But that was quite some time ago, and a lot has changed since then.

The biggest change has been that I am now a fan of plotting. A few people have commented that it seems like I wrote the first draft of Reflections faster than they expected, and that's mostly due to that fact that I had the whole thing outlined. I used to be a die-hard pantser, and this strategy made a significant difference in my writing productivity. After Blood and Water, I was so sick of struggling and slogging through drafts. I needed a change. That's why I started plotting.

It all started when I read Libbie Hawker's book, Take Off Your Pants!: Outline Your Books for Better, Faster WritingThis book changed my writing life. In a series of anecdotes and knowledge gleaned from personal experiences, Hawker provides tips for plotting a novel without losing your mind. That book, combined with this post by Rachel Aaron, made me view my process in an entirely different light. Based on what I learned from these wise ladies, here's how I'm plotting my books going forward:

  • Take note of what you know already. Whenever I get plot bunnies for a new book, I make sure to write them down in Evernote. That way, when it comes time to start plotting, I'm not starting from scratch.
  • Find your characters. Rachel Aaron recommends, at a minimum, knowing your main characters, antagonists, and power players. Don't get bogged down in character sheets right off the bat. All you need for now is names and some identifying details that are relevant to the story.
  • Figure out the end and the beginning. Try deciding them in that order. Once you've discovered the end, it's a lot easier to get there from the beginning. If you know the end, all you have to do is figure out how you're going to get there.
  • Determine the setting. Where and when will your novel take place? Consider some minor worldbuilding here, but like with the characters, make sure you don't get too wrapped up in the specifics of this part.
  • Fill in the gaps. If you have the beginning and the end of your novel down, all you have left to do is fill in the gaps. of course, this is much easier said than done. Focus on moving from one plot event to another, building a compelling, believable framework. Connect the major twists, scenes, and climaxes until you get to the conclusion. If you get stuck, don't panic. That's totally normal!

There you have it! Whether you're a full-fledged plotter or a pantser looking for a better way to write, consider giving some of these techniques a try. If you'd like more information, I wholeheartedly recommend reading Libbie Hawker's book. She goes into much more detail than I have in this post.